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1965 Vox Ace electric guitar
1965 Vox Ace electric guitar The Vox Ace was one of the early UK-designed Vox guitars produced by JMI in Dartford, Kent. It had been in production since at least 1962, but was redesigned for late 1963 with a more current look and a higher quality feel. The pickups were upgraded, as was the body; it was now thicker and made of solid wood. Despite this the guitar was now actually lighter in weight, due to a shorter overall length. Have a closer look at a sunburst-finished Vox Ace from 1965.
1962 Vox 'Choice of the Stars' catalogue
1962 Vox 'Choice of the Stars' catalogue, This is one of the earliest JMI catalogues to show guitars, and although undated it was most likely printed in late 1962 or early 1963. There are many well-known Vox guitar and amplifier models shown, amongst several that would be completely redesigned before appearing again; the most interesting examples are perhaps the Phantom I and Phantom II which are electronically quite distinct from the Phantom that would follow a little later. The Vox Escort and Vox Soloist only appear in this brochure, being deleted before the next was printed in mid-1963.
Older updates here

1963 Vox Stroller
Solid-body single pickup electric guitar

Vox Stroller main page | 1961 Vox Stroller | 1963 Vox Stroller

1963 Vox Stroller
Model 1963 Vox Stroller
Pickups One Vox V1 pickup
Scale 25 1/4"
Body Laminate body. Total length 35 1/2" long, Body length 14", 11" wide, 15/16" thick.
Neck Sycamore bolt-on neck. Rosewood fingerboard. No adjustable truss rod. 19 frets. Width at nut 1 5/8"
Hardware 1 volume and 1 tone control. Co-axial input. Floating bridge. Open gear strip tuners.
Weight 2.0 kg
1962 Vox "Choice of the Stars" brochure
The 1962 Vox "Choice of the Stars" was the only brochure to show the LG-50 style Shadow and Stroller guitars

The Vox Stroller was one of the simplest guitars Vox produced; a slab body, bolt-on neck, just one pickup, with a volume and tone control, a very simple wooden floating bridge and a coaxial input rather than a standard guitar jack.

A very rudimentary guitar indeed; although Vox's own description was more upbeat: Fine quality solo rhythm, solid electric guitar, high grade VOX electric strings and pick-up. Red or white cellulose finish, polished neck. Separate tone and volume controls.

But at just 2kg, surely one of the lightest guitars ever produced; perfect for the student guitarist of the early 1960s.

The single cutaway body style was shared with the earliest version of the Vox Shadow; both were based on the Guyatone / Antoria LG50, as played by Shadows guitarist Hank Marvin at the very beginning of the decade. The Shadows were probably the biggest guitar act in the UK, pre-Beatles, and they were certainly highly influential to a whole generation of up-and-coming guitarists. Vox certainly made the most of their endorsement, and when Hank Marvin moved over to the Fender Stratocaster, Vox followed suit, redesigning the Stroller and Shadow to a more Fenderesque double cutaway shape.

Vox experimented with a lot of different guitar models in the early part of the 1960s, and like many, the Guyatone-style single cutaway Stroller was short-lived; by the middle of 1963 they were no longer in the Vox range.

Vox V1 pickup with engraved Vox logo The Vox Stroller has one tone and one volume control The Vox Stroller had a very simple floating wooden bridge
This Vox Stroller has just one single-coil Vox V1 pickup - note the engraved Vox logo The Vox Stroller has one tone and one volume control The Vox Stroller had a very simple floating wooden bridge.
The very simple pressed-metal tailpiece is held to the body with six screws Vox Stroller coaxial input Vox Stroller neck joint without neck plate
The very simple pressed-metal tailpiece is held to the body with six screws The coaxial input is on the side of the guitar. Later these would be mounted on the scratchplate. This Vox Stroller has no neck plate, unlike later models.
Vox Stroller headstock Vox Stroller reverse heastock Decal of the Stroller model name, in the green scripted font of the early 1960s
Vox Stroller headstock. Reverse headstock - the serial number is stamped next to the tuning gears Decal of the "Stroller" model name, in the green scripted font of the early 1960s

Similar Models

The body itself is a very simple slab with no bevels or unecessary detail. The pickup route will accept a one or two pickup (Vox Shadow) scratchplate. All components simply screw into place. Vox did use laminate wood bodies, especially on their cheapest guitars - as is the case here; see the close up of the neck pocket below - but many also had solid wood (typically mahogany or agba).

Under the scratchplate of the Vox Stroller - just two potentiometers and a capacitor The body route was the same for the one-pickup Stroller or the two-pickup Shadow
Under the scratchplate of the Vox Stroller - just two potentiometers and a capacitor The body route was the same for the one-pickup Stroller or the two-pickup Shadow
The very simple circuitry of the Vox Stroller Vox Stroller neck pocket detail The body of this guitar is made of laminations of different woods - this can be clearly seen in the unfinished neck pocket area
The very simple circuitry of the Vox Stroller Vox Stroller neck pocket detail The body of this guitar is made of laminations of different woods - this can be clearly seen in the unfinished neck pocket area

Back to the VOX INDEX | comment



Vox guitars for sale


US ebay listings

Vintage VOX STRAP BUTTONS + STRING TREE Mark Phantom Spitfire Hurricane Teardrop

Current price: $49.99
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Time left: 1h 29m
New Wampler Ace Thirty Something Overdrive Pedal (Vox AC 30)

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Vintage VOX GUITAR Knobs Spitfire Phantom Teardrop Mark VI 3 KNOB SET

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VOX SHADOW by Jennings/JMI - Hank Marvin & Shadows Collector's Guitar c1963

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NEW Wampler ACE 30 Overdrive distortion AC Guitar effect pedal Vox

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Wampler Ace Thirty 30 pedal - Vintage class a tone - Vox - MINT

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Vintage VOX SPITFIRE PickGuard pots switch wiring jack

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Early model Vox Spitfire Guitar in Great shape. No Reserve Stratocaster inspired

Current price: $599.00
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See more results on eBay here


UK ebay listings

New Wampler Ace Thirty Something Overdrive Pedal (Vox AC 30)

Current price: £142.76
buy it now
Time left: 15h 3m
VOX SHADOW by Jennings/JMI - Hank Marvin & Shadows Collector's Guitar c1963

Current price: £495.00
buy it now
Time left: 2d 1h 27m
NEW Wampler ACE 30 Overdrive distortion AC Guitar effect pedal Vox

Current price: £142.76
buy it now
Time left: 2d 15h 20m
Vox Ace Deluxe tremelo cover 1960's

Current price: £50.00
buy it now
Time left: 6d 2h 47m
VOX SHADOW GUITAR. 1964. ALL ORIGINAL JMI MADE IN ENGLAND. COLLECTIBLE. RARE.

Current price: £1186.86
buy it now
Time left: 8d 3h 20m
New Wampler Ace Thirty Overdrive Boost VOX AC-30 (Free Shipping & Extras)

Current price: £142.76
buy it now
Time left: 10d 5h 10m
Vintage Vox Phantom Bridge-No Saddles 1960's Spitfire Hurricane Meteor

Current price: £17.25
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Time left: 19d 20h 54m
Vox 1965 Spitfire Sunburst Electric Guitar Great Condition Almost original HSC

Current price: £651.44
buy it now
Time left: 25d 8h 29m
See more results on eBay here

There are 2 comments on this article so far. Add your comment
Mack the Cat Comment left 3rd August 2012 10:10:33
My first guitar! Well not mine, my bro's, but I started out on it when he got a real Telecaster a little later. It was old and battered even when he got it, but fine for learning the basics, very easy to play as I recall. I never knew anything about it, so good to read your page. I had many a happy hour with that guitar. I wonder, he may still have it.
Adrian P. Comment left 10th February 2013 19:07:19
how do you date these UK Vox guitars please? Does the serial number tell you anything?

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