1976 Gibson L-6S Custom, 1978 Guild B302F bass, 1967 Fender Coronado guitar
1976 Gibson L-6S Custom1978 Guild B-302F1967 Fender Coronado
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Harmony Silhouette / Bob Kat, H14, H15, H16, H17 and H19

Solidbody electric guitar

The Harmony solid body series was launched in 1963, initially named the Silhouette, and produced in very large numbers at the Harmony factories in Chicago, USA. At first there were four models, ranging from the very simple H14, to the relatively highly-appointed H19. A number of very similar models were produced under different brands including Silvertone and Holiday.

The H14 and H15 were clearly entry-level, student models, with simple components and an ebonized maple fingerboard. All Harmony electric guitars were fitted with De Armond 'Golden-Tone' pickups, either the S-grille 'gold foil' soapbar without adjustable polepieces (H14, H15, H17) or the four-scroll 'moustache' soapbar with adjustable polepieces (H16, H19). The H19, although still retaining the same body style as the other Silhouettes, was actually larger, and fitted with the same Hagstrom bridge and vibrato as fitted to most Hagstrom and Guild guitars of the time. It also had a rosewood fingerboard with block position marker inlays. The differences between the models is summarised in the table below.

H14, H15, H17 and H19 Silhouette guitars from the 1963 Harmony catalogue

H14, H15, H17 and H19 Silhouette guitars from the 1963 Harmony catalogue

The table below summarises the features of each Silhouette / Bob Kat model. Other tailpiece options were available for all solid bodies, including vibratos by Harmony, Hagstrom and Bigsby, naturally at extra cost.

Model Pickups Bridge/Tailpiece Finishes Years Available Notes
H14 One De Armond Golden-Tone (S-grille soapbar) Fixed tailpiece, floating rosewood bridge Shaded Walnut 1963-1972 Clipped headstock style
H15 Two De Armond Golden-Tone (S-grille soapbar) Fixed tailpiece, floating rosewood bridge Shaded Walnut 1963-1972 Clipped headstock style
H16 Two De Armond Golden-Tone (four-scroll soapbar) Type W Vibrato, floating rosewood bridge H16R - Candy Apple Red; H16B - Metallic Blue; H16W - Gleaming White 1967-1972 Initially launched as the Color Kat. Rounded headstock style
H17 Two De Armond Golden-Tone (S-grille soapbar) Type G (1963), Type W (1964-) Vibrato, floating rosewood bridge Cherry Red Shaded 1963-1967 Rounded headstock style
H19 Two De Armond Golden-Tone (four-scroll soapbar) Hagstrom Type H Vibrato, fixed Hagstrom adjustable metal bridge Cherry Red Shaded 1963-68 Larger body than the other guitars in this series, block neck markers, tortoise-shell scratchplate, rounded headstock style

A bass version of the Silhouette was launched in 1966, the Harmony H25.

In 1967 the series underwent a number of changes, most obviously being renamed the Harmony Bob Kat; the H17 and H19 models were phased out at this time (although the H19 was included in at least one catalogue as late as 1970), being replaced by a new model the H16 Color Kat. This guitar sported a solid finish (either Candy Apple Red, Metallic Blue or Gleaming White).

H14, H15 and H16 Bob Kat guitars from the 1968 Harmony catalogue

H14, H15 and H16 Bob Kat guitars from the 1968 Harmony catalogue



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Harmony Silhouette / Bob Kat guitars for sale





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